Seeburg Mechanism Adjustments

OK, let’s say you’ve got things working… kinda. The mechanism on your Seeburg Jukebox is not engaging properly, maybe repeating, maybe skipping a beat here and there. You dig out your Seeburg mechanism manual which is as confusing as it is comprehensive. Maybe it’s this adjustment, maybe it’s that one. Or maybe I need to adjust A then B then C.

Seeburg Mechanism

Seeburg Mechanism

STOP what you’re doing! Put the tools down and step back from the mechanism.

Chances are that something is stuck, gummed-up or just not moving freely. The oils used over the years tend to turn from being a lubricant into a lacquer or glue or “the blob”. Unless you’ve changed a part, experienced a hard jamb that bent something, it’s probably NOT an adjustment.

The Seeburg 220 that I’ve been restoring had an issue where the tonearm carrier would not shift to the left to play the A side of the records. There was some stickiness to the clutches which with a little repetition and new oil freed up. Once that was working fine, I found that the main clutch wasn’t dropping down completely to go into scan mode. It would pop up enough where it wouldn’t reliably engage. It turns out the Clutch Lifting Adjustment had been fiddled with, apparently when the mech was still sticking. Using page 7 (2478) of the manual (see link above) I set the adjusting screw per Seeburg specs. A little lube here and there, and now the mech works as flawlessly as the day it was built.

How to burnish contact points on your Jukebox

First Clean the points with a contact point cleaner solvent.

Then make sure all leaves and points activate as required.

Then take your burnishing tool and carefully pass it between the contact points several times.

Don’t over-do it.

Contact Burnisher

Contact Burnisher

Seeburg Mechanism Repair – Stuck Clutch

On the Seeburg LPC-480 the clutch on the mechanism was stuck.. big time. I pulled the clutch assembly, which when it’s stuck can be a little difficult. The one area that probably doesn’t ever get lubricated properly is shown below. The shaft, item 1, that runs horizontally was tight on the housing,  the fork lifter, item 2 AND item 3. By removing the e-clip and tapping the shaft back and forth while adding some lube, all parts and the shaft pivot freely now.

 

Seeburg Clutch Repair

Seeburg Clutch Repair

Seeburg 220 Stereo Jukebox Up and Running

I’ve replaced all the caps that needed (or would soon be needed) to be replaced. When I got the seeburg 220, it had been partially restored, but there was a lot more to do. Here’s the bag of old caps that I replaced above and beyond what had already been replaced.

Seeburg 220 Amp Old Caps

Seeburg 220 Amp Old Caps

I replaced all but two of the 12AX7 dual triode tubes. I use an old Eico 635 Tube Tester which isn’t fancy, but gets the job done and is super reliable. My output tubes are Zenith 6973’s, possibly rebranded something else. They work well and the sound is really strong. To lengthen the life of the 6973 tubes I replaced the selenium diode in the bias/preamp supply circuit and increased the 47 ohm resistor to 75 ohms. That gave me a little bit more than -35 volts for the 6973 grid bias and no perceptible crossover distortion.

Here are the bottoms of the recapped Seeburg SHFA1 amp and TSU1 control unit.

 

Seeburg 220 SHFA1 Amp

Seeburg 220 SHFA1 Amp

 

Seeburg 220 TSU1 Control

Seeburg 220 TSU1 Control

Seeburg 220 Stereo Jukebox Restoration Project Begins

 I got a little sidetracked with another new arrival… This really cool Seeburg model 220 Stereo Jukebox.

The 220 is the first model (100 select) that offered stereo music. This Seeburg came to me partially restored. The mech had an issue, and a number of things not quite done. Here’s it sitting, a couple of parts have been removed for servicing.

 

Seeburg 220 Stereo Jukebox

Seeburg 220 Stereo Jukebox

 

Seeburg LPC480 45TASU1 Auto Speed Control Recapped

The Seeburg 45TASU1 auto speed control is fairly simple, yet is key to the functioning of your LPC 480. If the 45 RPM records play too slow, or play ok for a while then sound sluggish, or if they don’t play at all, it’s probably that the 45TASU1 needs rebuilding. The big oval aluminum capacitor is most likely the cause of erratic 45 record speed problems, but while that’s being replaced, it’s best to replace the other capacitors. There’s only a few. If the oval aluminum cap is original, it should be replaced whether it’s good or bad, because it will go bad.

Seeburg 45TASU1 Auto Speed Control

Seeburg 45TASU1 Auto Speed Control

Seeburg LPC480 TSA1 Amp Recapped

Changed out ALL the Electrolytics and paper caps on the Seeburg TSA1. Newer caps are physically much smaller than the originals. Mounting can be a challenge due to their smaller size making lead lengths a little short.

I usaully clip the old leads close to the cap, that way I have something to attach to. Sometimes you need to remove the oxidation from wires to get a good solder joint. If there’s a nearby unused terminal lug, it can be used to attach and help support the new components.

Nice thing about the TSA1 amp is it can be operated completely removed from the cabinet. I hooked it up to my home stereo speakers. Man it really cranks!

Here’s the recapped amp:

Seeburg LPC480 Amp ReCapped

Seeburg LPC480 Amp ReCapped

 

Seeburg LPC480 Prepping for Restoration (Part 2)

Before powering up a non-working Jukebox, the Jukebox needs to have everything Re-Capped . Re-Capping is the process of replacing ALL the Electrolytic and Paper (and if any Wax) capacitors. Electrolytics are polarized capacitors. Sometimes they’re in an aluminum “can”, sometimes wrapped in cardboard or a clear plastic sleeve. In the picture below, there’s one large aluminum capacitor, three medium-size 1200-µf  capacitors and various smaller capacitors (you can see one marked “Germany”).  These ALL get replaced. It takes a bit of dexterity and soldering skills to get into some of the tight places. This amplifier, if I counted right, has 17 electrolytics. The replacement capacitors are physically much smaller and reaching the solder points is an art unto itself. It is imperative that the new capacitors are installed with the correct polarity, or things go horribly wrong! The Speed Control and Tormac Control Center also need to be Re-Capped.

Seeburg TSA1 Solid State Amplifier

Seeburg TSA1 Solid State Amplifier Original Caps

 

Seeburg LPC-480 Restoration Project Part-1

Follow along as I restore my non-working Seeburg LPC-480. Most of what I’ll cover also applies to the LPC-1 Seeburg Jukebox.

Most jukeboxes are too heavy to economically ship. They can weigh over 300 pounds! So I drove to pick up my Seeburg project.

Here is the as-is where-is picture before pickup:

Seeburg Jukebox LPC 480

Seeburg Jukebox LPC 480

Here are some photos of the inside of the Seeburg LPC480:

Seeburg Title Strips and Pushbuttons

Seeburg Title Strips and Pushbuttons

 

Seeburg LPC480 Speakers

Seeburg LPC480 Speakers

 

Seeburg LPC480 Amplifier

Seeburg LPC480 Amplifier

 

Seeburg LPC480 Transistor Amp

Seeburg LPC480 Transistor Amp

 

Seeburg LPC480 Speed and Tormat Controller

Seeburg LPC480 Speed and Tormat Controller